China in B&W


Consider “Classical China,” which considered the Yi 夷 as the “others,” viewing them as inferior and subordinate. As a result, they felt there was no need to translate writings from other languages and other peoples into their own language. For a considerable amount of time, new ideas could not be added to or incorporated into the old Chinese language because of this lack of translations. But as Buddhism gradually spread throughout China and missionary Fathers (including the first Matteo Ricci) arrived at the Chinese court between the end of the Ming 明 dynasty (1378–1644) and the start of the Qing 青 dynasty (1644–1911), a scientific lexicon influenced by Western knowledge was introduced into the Chinese language for the first time.”**

My black-and-white images of China are like a window into a time in the past that we could not witness. Through the shapes of the locations I visited, I aim to convey to you the soul of this nation—a rainbow of colours, sounds from the streets, and aromas from delectable dishes made using traditional Chinese recipes.

 

 

(**Chinese Translation Theory, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 1992)

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